Interviewing is...

There have been a few situations lately (and by “lately” I mean the last 1.5 decades that I’ve been in this crazy industry) that have caused significant glitches in the interview process, and in some cases costing our clients well-qualified and talented candidates. I did some quick research in thinking about writing this post – and pretty much stopped at the Google search results in absolute awe…

 Firstly, I learned about Quizlet. Second, I’m really curious about interviewing ISIS – I mean, there’s a process? Is there a personality test? I’m not into conspiracies, nor do I think the government is interested in my search results – I probably bored them long ago – “She’s Googling what’s a normal resting heart rate again...” And I don’t put a piece of paper over that little camera – anyone who wants to look at my confused face all day long is welcome to it. That said, I did not research how to interview ISIS, despite my morbid curiosity…

I digress…here are the top results.

 
 
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And here is what I hoped to see…

Interviewing is…the first step in your on-boarding process.

Who loves cliché’s more than me? “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.” So true, yet we treat candidates like second-class citizens and the interview process like a joke. Look at the top search results to tell you how candidates feel about interviewing – it’s exhausting. Even in a candidate-driven market (as we’ve been in for quite a while now) – companies still don’t seem to understand the importance of candidate care, having a cohesive interview process, or maintaining communication.

We recently lost a candidate to a competing, even though our client wanted to hire them - and the candidate probably would have preferred our client (on paper). After the second interview, the client went dark. We could not get the client to get back to us, we tried everything outside of hiring a plane carrying a banner saying, “Call your favorite Recruiter.” When we finally heard back we had to explain that the candidate took another offer – the client was furious – but that’s the risk. The candidate didn’t feel important at all – they didn’t feel loved and worried this would be an indicator of how they would be treated if they worked for that particular company. I have a long list of similar stories – a missed phone screen, an interview arrives and has to wait for 45 minutes to meet anyone, interviewers who aren’t engaged or who don’t really know the role well enough to speak of it, and more than anything – hiring managers and recruiters that simply go dark, leaving the candidate without any understanding, consideration or the courtesy of closure.

Mikal Harden